11 Comments

  1. Katherine,
    Great post. I totally agree with your blog. Self-motivation is probably the most important soft-skill that we can process. I try to embrace the differences between my employees and use them to the business’s best advantage. In regards to who gets to be the CEO, I have never been one to need a title to accomplish my mission. I think that I can see where the power struggle could easily take down a business. Great post.
    Tina Jones

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tina,
      I agree, I do not need a title to feel accomplished or know I have done a great job. I do think this is one of the top reasons many business’s do not take off, they can’t even agree on who is going to run the company. This all should be decided before the venture starts.
      Katherine

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  2. Katherine,
    You brought up an interesting aspect of the CEO dilemma when working with a partner. How do you justify and question each other’s passion without being offensive? I think the best way to solve this problem without hurting feelings or breaking a partnership before it begins is by figuring out personal strengths. That way you can create rolls based on skill instead of passion. I agree with your statement about hiring motivated people. That is something that you can’t train into someone no how hard you try. You can train someone to do word processing or data entry but you can’t teach them a work ethic. Great post this week!
    Bri

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Katherine,
    I have a similar dilemma as you laid out. I sometimes fall into the habit of thinking I know best and nobody else would be a better fit to lead my prospective company. I know that is simply not the truth in the long run. I may be the best to lead the company but I have to be ok with taking criticism from other leaders. I have to be able to hire strong candidates to surround me and challenge me on a daily basis. I believe that is the only way that a company can continue to grow and avoid failure.

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  4. Taylor,
    Yes, this chapter in the book made me really think outside the box. I see the good in both sides. At the end of the day, we have to evaluate our company and do what we feel is best to move forward and grow.
    Katherine

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  5. I am glad you recognize that about yourself and know you would have a hard time being confrontational. That should benefit you in the long run. You had a lot of good content but I wanted to touch on the shaping of an A-player without experience. I love that as well. As a tennis coach, I love getting players who don’t have any previous bad habits. It makes teaching them so much easier because they don’t think they already know what is best and refuse to listen. Great work!

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  6. Turner,
    Yes! I love getting employees who don’t have alot of experience so you can mold them your way. Love the Tennis analogy, I am tennis fan. I do feel you can find those diamonds in the ruff and make them your A-players.
    Katherine

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  7. I agree it is stressful imagining those confrontations about political power and position. I guess its important to discuss this stuff early on so you don’t start jockeying for those positions later when it can make or break a venture nearing successful startup.

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    1. Yes, I agree this all needs to be in place before you really start a business. I believe it will help your business run smooth and organized. How will you have a vision if there is not structure?
      Katherine

      Like

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